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Decolonial Approaches to Latin American Literatures and Cultures

Decolonial Approaches to Latin American Literatures and Cultures PDF Author: Juan G. Ramos
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1349933589
Category : Literary Criticism
Languages : en
Pages : 235

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Book Description
Decolonial Approaches to Latin American Literatures and Cultures engages and problematizes concepts such as “decolonial” and “coloniality” to question methodologies in literary and cultural scholarship. While the eleven contributions produce diverse approaches to literary and cultural texts ranging from Pre-Columbian to contemporary works, there is a collective questioning of the very idea of “Latin America,” what “Latin American” contains or leaves out, and the various practices and locations constituting Latinamericanism. This transdisciplinary study aims to open an evolving corpus of decolonial scholarship, providing a unique entry point into the literature and material culture produced from precolonial to contemporary times.

Decolonial Approaches to Latin American Literatures and Cultures

Decolonial Approaches to Latin American Literatures and Cultures PDF Author: Juan G. Ramos
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1349933589
Category : Literary Criticism
Languages : en
Pages : 235

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Book Description
Decolonial Approaches to Latin American Literatures and Cultures engages and problematizes concepts such as “decolonial” and “coloniality” to question methodologies in literary and cultural scholarship. While the eleven contributions produce diverse approaches to literary and cultural texts ranging from Pre-Columbian to contemporary works, there is a collective questioning of the very idea of “Latin America,” what “Latin American” contains or leaves out, and the various practices and locations constituting Latinamericanism. This transdisciplinary study aims to open an evolving corpus of decolonial scholarship, providing a unique entry point into the literature and material culture produced from precolonial to contemporary times.

A Companion to Latin American Literature and Culture

A Companion to Latin American Literature and Culture PDF Author: Sara Castro-Klaren
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1119692539
Category : Literary Criticism
Languages : en
Pages : 772

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Book Description
Cutting-edge and insightful discussions of Latin American literature and culture In the newly revised second edition of A Companion to Latin American Literature and Culture, Sara Castro-Klaren delivers an eclectic and revealing set of discussions on Latin American culture and literature by scholars at the cutting edge of their respective fields. The included essays—whether they're written from the perspective of historiography, affect theory, decolonial approaches, or human rights—introduce readers to topics like gaucho literature, postcolonial writing in the Andes, and baroque art while pointing to future work on the issues raised. This work engages with anthropology, history, individual memory, testimonio, and environmental studies. It also explores: A thorough introduction to topics of coloniality, including the mapping of the pre-Columbian Americas and colonial religiosity Comprehensive explorations of the emergence of national communities in New Imperial coordinates, including discussions of the Muisca and Mayan cultures Practical discussions of global and local perspectives in Latin American literature, including explorations of Latin American photography and cultural modalities and cross-cultural connections In-depth examinations of uncharted topics in Latin American literature and culture, including discussions of femicide and feminist performances and eco-perspectives Perfect for students in undergraduate and graduate courses tackling Latin American literature and culture topics, A Companion to Latin American Literature and Culture, Second Edition will also earn a place in the libraries of members of the general public and PhD students interested in Latin American literature and culture.

Race in American Literature and Culture

Race in American Literature and Culture PDF Author: John Ernest
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1108803016
Category : Literary Criticism
Languages : en
Pages :

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Book Description
Exploring the unsteady foundations of American literary history, Race in American Literature and Culture examines the hardening of racial fault lines throughout the nineteenth century and into the twentieth while considering aspects of the literary and interrelated traditions that emerged from this fractured cultural landscape. A multicultural study of the influential and complex presence of race in the American imagination, the book pushes debate in exciting new directions. Offering expert explorations of how the history of race has been represented and written about, it shows in what ways those representations and writings have influenced wider American culture. Distinguished scholars from African American, Latinx, Asian American, Native American, and white American studies foreground the conflicts in question across different traditions and different modes of interpretation, and are thus able comprehensively and creatively to address in the volume how and why race has been so central to American literature as a whole.

Teaching Modern Latin American Poetries

Teaching Modern Latin American Poetries PDF Author: Jill S. Kuhnheim
Publisher: Modern Language Association
ISBN: 1603294104
Category : Language Arts & Disciplines
Languages : en
Pages : 344

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Book Description
The essays in this book, groundbreaking for its focus on teaching Latin American poetry, reflect the region's geographic and cultural heterogeneity. They address works from Mexico, Chile, Peru, Ecuador, Colombia, Cuba, Brazil, Argentina, Guatemala, Nicaragua, and Uruguay, as well as from indigenous communities found within these national distinctions, including the Kaqchikel Maya and Zapotec. The volume's essays help instructors teach poetry written from the second half of the twentieth century on, meaningfully connecting this contemporary corpus with older poetic traditions. Contributors address teaching various topics, from the silva and the long poem to Afro-descendant poetry, in ways that bring performance, digital approaches, queer theory, and translation into action. The insights offered here will demonstrate how Latin American poetry can become a part of classes in African diasporic studies, indigenous studies, history, and anthropology.

Transnational Spanish Studies

Transnational Spanish Studies PDF Author: Catherine Davies
Publisher: Liverpool University Press
ISBN: 1789627281
Category : Language Arts & Disciplines
Languages : en
Pages : 366

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Book Description
The focus of this book is two-fold. First it traces the expansive geographical spread of the language commonly referred to as Spanish. This has given rise to multiple hybrid formations over time emerging in the clash of multiple cultures, languages and religions within and between great empires (Roman, Islamic, Hispano-Catholic), each with expansionist policies leading to wars, huge territorial gains and population movements. This long history makes Hispanophone culture itself a supranational, trans-imperial one long before we witness its various national cultures being refashioned as a result of the transnational processes associated with globalization today. Indeed, the Spanish language we recognise today was ‘transnational’ long before it was ever the foundation of a single nation state. Secondly, it approaches the more recent post-national, translingual and inter-subjective ‘border-crossings’ that characterise the global world today with an eye to their unfolding within this long trans-imperial history of the Hispanophone world. In doing so, it maps out some of the contemporary post-colonial, decolonial and trans-Atlantic inflections of this trans-imperial history as manifest in literature, cinema, music and digital cultures. Contributors: Christopher J. Pountain, L.P. Harvey, James T. Monroe, Rosaleen Howard, Mark Thurner, Alexander Samson, Andrew Ginger, Samuel Llano, Philip Swanson, Claire Taylor, Emily Baker, Elzbieta Slodowska, Francisco-J. Hernández Adrián, Henriette Partzsch, Helen Melling, Conrad James and Benjamin Quarshie.

Global South Modernities

Global South Modernities PDF Author: Gorica Majstorovic
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 1498576184
Category : Literary Criticism
Languages : en
Pages : 155

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Book Description
Global South Modernities: Modernist Literature and the Avant-Garde in Latin America examines the seminal influence that Latin American writers had on the style, subject matter, and ideology of literature in the Global South from 1900 to the late 1930s. Gorica Majstorovic challenges the historical and racial logic of interwar Latin American literary studies by introducing the solidarity relations between the global decolonial movements and placing anti-imperialism, Blackness, and indigeneity at the center of decolonial analysis. Following Mignolo, de Sousa Santos, and Cheah, the texts under analysis subvert the processes of European colonial worlding and show modernity itself as pluralized. Drawing on these works, Majstorovic bridges the gap between aesthetics and politics while shifting the focus onto the Latin American transnational modernist networks and situating the analysis within the theoretical frameworks of the Global South. While examining the idea of globality through its different conceptualizations (cosmopolitanism, immigration, and travel), Majstorovic analyzes avant-garde magazines of the 1920s, Mexican petrofiction, urban proletarian, and decolonial travel narratives of the 1930s, calling into question modernism’s usual framing as an Anglo-American interwar phenomenon. Majstorovic constructs a new genealogy of Latin American literature by examining the asymmetrical relations within its multiple modernities and offers a new understanding of Latin American interwar literature through the lens of the Global South.

Recovering Lost Footprints, Volume 2

Recovering Lost Footprints, Volume 2 PDF Author: Arturo Arias
Publisher: State University of New York Press
ISBN: 1438472609
Category : Literary Criticism
Languages : en
Pages : 394

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Book Description
Analyzes contemporary Yucatecan and Chiapanecan Maya narratives. Recovering Lost Footprints, Volume 2 is an in-depth analysis of the sociohistorical conflict impacting Indigenous communities in Latin America. Continuing the project he began in volume 1, Arturo Arias analyzes contemporary Peninsular and Chiapanecan Maya narratives. He examines the works of Yucatecan writers Jorge Cocom Pech, Javier Gómez Navarrete, Isaac Carrillo Can, and Marisol Ceh Moo. For Chiapas, Arias looks at the works of Tseltal novelist Diego Méndez Guzmán, Tsotsil short-story writer Nicolás Huet Bautista, and Tseltal narrative writer Josías López Gómez. Arias problematizes the nature of Western modernity and the crisis of Western models of development in the present. By way of his analysis, he suggests that we are facing a historical impasse because we have neglected native knowledges that offer alternative codes of ethics and beingness that emerge from Indigenous cosmovisions. The text skillfully contributes to and strengthens debates between US-centered and Latin American cultural studies theorists, as well as the hemispheric expansion of Native American and Indigenous Studies. Recovering Lost Footprints, Volume 2 is inspired more by the past as it impinges upon a continuing, constantly expanding present. Arias’s reading of Maya literatures forces us to reconsider the space-time structure of Western thinking. Indeed, this book is intriguing precisely because it views literature from an Indigenous perspective, evidencing how that social space is full of multiple contrasting experiences and historical processes. Arturo Arias is John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Professor in the Humanities at the University of California, Merced and the author of Recovering Lost Footprints, Volume 1: Contemporary Maya Narratives, also published by SUNY Press.

Digital Activism, Community Media, and Sustainable Communication in Latin America

Digital Activism, Community Media, and Sustainable Communication in Latin America PDF Author: Cheryl Martens
Publisher: Springer Nature
ISBN: 3030453944
Category : Social Science
Languages : en
Pages : 358

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Book Description
This book brings together academic and activist work on community media, feminist, decolonial, and Indigenous perspectives to digital activism, including Free and Open Communication in Latin America. The essays in this collection speak to major changes over the past decade that are reshaping digital media uses and practices. The case studies presented here question many commonly held assumptions around global media ownership, sustainability, and access relevant to countries beyond Latin American contexts.

Beyond Human

Beyond Human PDF Author: Tara Daly
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 1684480698
Category : Literary Criticism
Languages : en
Pages : 238

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Book Description
In the Andes, indigenous knowledge systems based on the relationships between different beings, both earthly and heavenly, animal and plant, have been central to the organization of knowledge since precolonial times. The legacies of colonialism and the continuance of indigenous cultures make the Andes a unique place from which to think about art and social change as ongoing, and as encompassing more than an exclusively human perspective. Beyond Human revises established readings of the avant-gardes in Peru and Bolivia as humanizing and historical. By presenting fresh readings of canonical authors like César Vallejo, José María Arguedas, and Magda Portal, and through analysis of newer artist-activists like Julieta Paredes, Mujeres Creando Comunidad, and Alejandra Dorado, Daly argues instead that avant-gardes complicate questions of agency and contribute to theoretical discussions on vital materialisms: the idea that life happens between animate and inanimate beings—human and non-human—and is made sensible through art. Published by Bucknell University Press. Distributed worldwide by Rutgers University Press.

The Palgrave Handbook of Cold War Literature

The Palgrave Handbook of Cold War Literature PDF Author: Andrew Hammond
Publisher: Springer Nature
ISBN: 3030389731
Category : Literary Criticism
Languages : en
Pages : 831

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Book Description
This book offers a comprehensive guide to global literary engagement with the Cold War. Eschewing the common focus on national cultures, the collection defines Cold War literature as an international current focused on the military and ideological conflicts of the age and characterised by styles and approaches that transcended national borders. Drawing on specialists from across the world, the volume analyses the period’s fiction, poetry, drama and autobiographical writings in three sections: dominant concerns (socialism, decolonisation, nuclearism, propaganda, censorship, espionage), common genres (postmodernism, socialism realism, dystopianism, migrant poetry, science fiction, testimonial writing) and regional cultures (Asia, Africa, Oceania, Europe and the Americas). In doing so, the volume forms a landmark contribution to Cold War literary studies which will appeal to all those working on literature of the 1945-1989 period, including specialists in comparative literature, postcolonial literature, contemporary literature and regional literature.