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Networked News, Racial Divides

Networked News, Racial Divides PDF Author: Sue Robinson
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1108419895
Category : Political Science
Languages : en
Pages :

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Book Description
Tracks power, privilege, and processes of community trust building in digitized media ecologies, focusing on public dialogues about racial inequality.

Networked News, Racial Divides

Networked News, Racial Divides PDF Author: Sue Robinson
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1108419895
Category : Political Science
Languages : en
Pages :

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Book Description
Tracks power, privilege, and processes of community trust building in digitized media ecologies, focusing on public dialogues about racial inequality.

Networked News, Racial Divides

Networked News, Racial Divides PDF Author: Sue Robinson
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9781108412322
Category : Political Science
Languages : en
Pages : 280

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Book Description
Against conventional wisdom, pervasive black-white disparities pair with vitriolic public conversation in politically progressive communities throughout America. Networked News, Racial Divides examines obstacles to public dialogues about racial inequality and opportunities for better discourse in mid-sized, liberal cities. The book narrates the challenges faced when talking about race through a series of stories about each community struggling with K-12 education achievement gaps. Media expert Sue Robinson applies Bourdieusian field theory to understand media ecologies and analyze whose voices get heard and whose get left out. She explores how privilege shapes discourse and how identity politics can interfere with deliberation. Drawing on network analysis of community dialogues, interviews with journalists, politicians, activists, and citizens and deep case study of five cities, this reflexive and occasionally narrative book chronicles the institutional, cultural and other problematic realities to amplifying voices of all people while also recommending strategies to move forward and build trust.

News for the Rich, White, and Blue

News for the Rich, White, and Blue PDF Author: Nikki Usher
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231545606
Category : Language Arts & Disciplines
Languages : en
Pages :

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Book Description
As cash-strapped metropolitan newspapers struggle to maintain their traditional influence and quality reporting, large national and international outlets have pivoted to serving readers who can and will choose to pay for news, skewing coverage toward a wealthy, white, and liberal audience. Amid rampant inequality and distrust, media outlets have become more out of touch with the democracy they purport to serve. How did journalism end up in such a predicament, and what are the prospects for achieving a more equitable future? In News for the Rich, White, and Blue, Nikki Usher recasts the challenges facing journalism in terms of place, power, and inequality. Drawing on more than a decade of field research, she illuminates how journalists decide what becomes news and how news organizations strategize about the future. Usher shows how newsrooms remain places of power, largely white institutions growing more elite as journalists confront a shrinking job market. She details how Google, Facebook, and the digital-advertising ecosystem have wreaked havoc on the economic model for quality journalism, leaving local news to suffer. Usher also highlights how the handful of likely survivors—well-funded media outlets such as the New York Times—increasingly appeal to a global, “placeless” reader. News for the Rich, White, and Blue concludes with a series of provocative recommendations to reimagine journalism to ensure its resiliency and its ability to speak to a diverse set of issues and readers.

Journalism Education for the Digital Age

Journalism Education for the Digital Age PDF Author: Brian Creech
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1000420930
Category : Social Science
Languages : en
Pages : 142

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Book Description
This book examines pressing debates concerning how and why journalism education should respond to digital changes in and around the industry, and questions market oriented ideology and civic responsibility in the field. Surveying a broad field of discourse and research into journalism education, Creech shows how public ideals, market logics and industry concerns have come to animate discussions about digital journalism education and journalism’s future, and how academic structures and cultures are positioned as a key obstacle to attaining that future. The book examines labor conditions, critiques of journalism education as an institution, and curricular change, with reference to how conversations around race, fake news, and digital infrastructures impact the field. Creech argues for a critical pedagogy of journalism education, one that pushes beyond jobs training and instead is centred around a commitment to public and civic value via a liberal arts tradition made practicable for the digital age. This insightful book is vital reading for journalism educators and scholars, as well as journalists and news executives, education scholars, and program officers and decision-makers at journalism-adjacent foundations and think tanks.

Community-Centered Journalism

Community-Centered Journalism PDF Author: Andrea Wenzel
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252052188
Category : Social Science
Languages : en
Pages : 216

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Book Description
Contemporary journalism faces a crisis of trust that threatens the institution and may imperil democracy itself. Critics and experts see a renewed commitment to local journalism as one solution. But a lasting restoration of public trust requires a different kind of local journalism than is often imagined, one that engages with and shares power among all sectors of a community. Andrea Wenzel models new practices of community-centered journalism that build trust across boundaries of politics, race, and class, and prioritize solutions while engaging the full range of local stakeholders. Informed by case studies from rural, suburban, and urban settings, Wenzel's blueprint reshapes journalism norms and creates vigorous storytelling networks between all parts of a community. Envisioning a portable, rather than scalable, process, Wenzel proposes a community-centered journalism that, once implemented, will strengthen lines of local communication, reinvigorate civic participation, and forge a trusting partnership between media and the people they cover.

News Hole

News Hole PDF Author: Danny Hayes
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1108834779
Category : Language Arts & Disciplines
Languages : en
Pages : 250

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Book Description
Explores how the decline in local political reporting has depressed citizen engagement with local politics in the US.

Reckoning

Reckoning PDF Author: Candis Callison
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190067101
Category : Language Arts & Disciplines
Languages : en
Pages : 272

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Book Description
How do journalists know what they know? Who gets to decide what good journalism is and when it's done right? What sort of expertise do journalists have, and what role should and do they play in society? Until a couple of decades ago, journalists rarely asked these questions, largely because the answers were generally undisputed. Now, the stakes are rising for journalists as they face real-time critique and audience pushback for their ethics, news reporting, and relevance. Yet the crises facing journalism have been narrowly defined as the result of disruption by new technologies and economic decline. This book argues that the concerns are in fact much more profound. Drawing on their five years of research with journalists in the U.S. and Canada, in a variety of news organizations from startups and freelancers to mainstream media, the authors find a digital reckoning taking place regarding journalism's founding ideals and methods. The book explores journalism's long-standing representational harms, arguing that despite thoughtful explorations of the role of publics in journalism, the profession hasn't adequately addressed matters of gender, race, intersectionality, and settler colonialism. In doing so, the authors rethink the basis for what journalism says it could and should do, suggesting that a turn to strong objectivity and systems journalism provides a path forward. They offer insights from journalists' own experiences and efforts at repair, reform, and transformation to consider how journalism can address its limits and possibilities along with widening media publics.

Journalism Research That Matters

Journalism Research That Matters PDF Author: Valérie Bélair-Gagnon
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0197538509
Category : Political Science
Languages : en
Pages : 258

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Book Description
It is now well-established that the long-time economic model on which the news industry has relied is no longer sustainable. Facebook, Google, and declining levels of popular trust in the media have been major contributors to this situation. Simultaneously, the closure of local media outlets across the country has left many areas without access to regional news, compounded the distance between media and publics, and further eroded civic engagement. Despite the looming crisis in journalism, a research-practice gap plagues the news industry. This book argues that an underappreciated factor in the news crisis is a potentially symbiotic relationship between journalism studies and the industry that it researches. As this book contends, scholars must think about their work in a public context, and journalists, too, need to listen to media scholars and take the research that they do seriously. Including contributions from journalists and academics, Journalism Research That Matters offers journalists a guide on what they need to know and journalism scholars a call to action for what kind of research they can do to best help the news industry reckon with disruption. The book looks at new research developments surrounding audience behavior, social networks, and journalism business models; the challenges that scholars face in making their research available to the public and to journalists; the financial survival of quality news and information; and blind spots in the way that researchers and journalists do their work, especially around race, diversity, and inequality. A final section includes contributions from journalists about how researchers can better engage on the ground with newsrooms and media professionals.

Transforming Newsrooms

Transforming Newsrooms PDF Author: Jonathan Groves
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317554663
Category : Language Arts & Disciplines
Languages : en
Pages : 244

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Book Description
Transforming Newsrooms offers a practical guide to navigating structural and culture change for news organizations facing economic disruption in today’s rapidly changing media landscape. Even when the need for change is obvious, the best ideas and intentions are often not followed by successful execution. This book offers a road map for understanding the obstacles to change in news organizations and how to overcome them. Providing a detailed overview of the ways in which news processes and routines are being fundamentally altered to meet new demands for multimedia, interactivity, and immediacy, the book offers tips to help news organizations better serve communities by understanding what information people need and how they want to engage and collaborate. The book also features a variety of case studies and examples from news organizations of all kinds, including a 10-year in-depth investigation of the Christian Science Monitor, the first national news organization to stop its daily presses for a digital report. Transforming Newsrooms is an invaluable resource for students and media professionals alike, demonstrating how to make research on organizational change actionable and help build a more equitable journalism model that will survive and thrive when we need it most.

Information and Democracy

Information and Democracy PDF Author: Stuart N. Soroka
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1108865178
Category : Political Science
Languages : en
Pages :

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Book Description
Around the world, there are increasing concerns about the accuracy of media coverage. It is vital in representative democracies that citizens have access to reliable information about what is happening in government policy, so that they can form meaningful preferences and hold politicians accountable. Yet much research and conventional wisdom questions whether the necessary information is available, consumed, and understood. This study is the first large-scale empirical investigation into the frequency and reliability of media coverage in five policy domains, and it provides tools that can be exported to other areas, in the US and elsewhere. Examining decades of government spending, media coverage, and public opinion in the US, this book assesses the accuracy of media coverage, and measures its direct impact on citizens' preferences for policy. This innovative study has far-reaching implications for those studying and teaching politics as well as for reporters and citizens.