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The Color Answer Book

The Color Answer Book PDF Author: Leatrice Eiseman
Publisher: Capital Books
ISBN: 9781933102108
Category : Architecture
Languages : en
Pages : 172

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Book Description
From home decor and gardening to fashion and health, color expert and bestselling author Eiseman answers more than 150 commonly asked questions in this beautiful guide to the influence of color.

The Color Answer Book

The Color Answer Book PDF Author: Leatrice Eiseman
Publisher: Capital Books
ISBN: 9781933102108
Category : Architecture
Languages : en
Pages : 172

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Book Description
From home decor and gardening to fashion and health, color expert and bestselling author Eiseman answers more than 150 commonly asked questions in this beautiful guide to the influence of color.

Color

Color PDF Author: Kenneth L. Kelly
Publisher:
ISBN:
Category : Color
Languages : en
Pages : 198

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The Color Bind

The Color Bind PDF Author: Erica Gabrielle Foldy
Publisher: Russell Sage Foundation
ISBN: 1610448219
Category : Social Science
Languages : en
Pages : 216

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Book Description
Since the 1960s, the dominant model for fostering diversity and inclusion in the United States has been the “color blind” approach, which emphasizes similarity and assimilation and insists that people should be understood as individuals, not as members of racial or cultural groups. This approach is especially prevalent in the workplace, where discussions about race and ethnicity are considered taboo. Yet, as widespread as “color blindness” has become, many studies show that the practice has damaging repercussions, including reinforcing the existing racial hierarchy by ignoring the significance of racism and discrimination. In The Color Bind, workplace experts Erica Foldy and Tamara Buckley investigate race relations in office settings, looking at how both color blindness and what they call “color cognizance” have profound effects on the ways coworkers think and interact with each other. Based on an intensive two-and-a-half-year study of employees at a child welfare agency, The Color Bind shows how color cognizance—the practice of recognizing the profound impact of race and ethnicity on life experiences while affirming the importance of racial diversity—can help workers move beyond silence on the issue of race toward more inclusive workplace practices. Drawing from existing psychological and sociological research that demonstrates the success of color-cognizant approaches in dyads, workgroups and organizations, Foldy and Buckley analyzed the behavior of work teams within a child protection agency. The behaviors of three teams in particular reveal the factors that enable color cognizance to flourish. While two of the teams largely avoided explicitly discussing race, one group, “Team North,” openly talked about race and ethnicity in team meetings. By acknowledging these differences when discussing how to work with their clients and with each other, the members of Team North were able to dig into challenges related to race and culture instead of avoiding them. The key to achieving color cognizance within the group was twofold: It required both the presence of at least a few members who were already color cognizant, as well as an environment in which all team members felt relatively safe and behaved in ways that strengthened learning, including productively resolving conflict and reflecting on their practice. The Color Bind provides a useful lens for policy makers, researchers and practitioners pursuing in a wide variety of goals, from addressing racial disparities in health and education to creating diverse and inclusive organizations to providing culturally competent services to clients and customers. By foregrounding open conversations about race and ethnicity, Foldy and Buckley show that institutions can transcend the color bind in order to better acknowledge and reflect the diverse populations they serve.

The Color of Modernism

The Color of Modernism PDF Author: Deborah Ascher Barnstone
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 1350251356
Category : Architecture
Languages : en
Pages : 256

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Book Description
One of the most enduring and pervasive myths about modernist architecture is that it was white-pure white walls both inside and out. Yet nothing could be further from the truth. The Color of Modernism explodes this myth of whiteness by offering a riot of color in modern architectural treatises, polemics, and buildings. Focusing on Germany in the early 20th century, one of modernism's most foundational and influential periods, it examines the different scientific and artistic color theories which were advanced by members of the German avant-garde, from Bruno Taut to Walter Gropius to Hans Scharoun. German color theory went on to have a profound influence on the modern movement, and Germany serves as the key case study for an international phenomenon which encompassed modern architects worldwide from le Corbusier and Alvar Aalto to Berthold Lubetkin and Lina Bo Bardi. Supported by accessible introductions to the development of color theory in philosophy, science and the arts, the book uses the German case to explore the new ways in which color was used in architecture and urban design, turning attention to an important yet overlooked aspect of the period. Much more than a mere correction to the historical record, the book leads the reader on an adventure into the color-filled worlds of psychology, the paranormal, theories of sensory perception, and pleasure, showing how each in turn influenced the modern movement. The Color of Modernism will fundamentally change the way the early modernist period is seen and discussed.

The Color Revolutions

The Color Revolutions PDF Author: Lincoln A. Mitchell
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 0812244176
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 243

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Book Description
This book explores the origins of the Color Revolutions in Georgia, Ukraine, and Kyrgyzstan, asking what made them possible and what their impact was in each of these three countries. Ultimately, it argues that they had little impact on democratic development and were as much reflections of continuity as of radical change.

Disabilities of the Color Line

Disabilities of the Color Line PDF Author: Dennis Tyler
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 1479821853
Category : Literary Criticism
Languages : en
Pages :

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Book Description
Reveals how disability and disablement have shaped Black social life in America Through both law and custom, the color line has cast Black people as innately disabled and thus unfit for freedom, incapable of self-governance, and contagious within the national body politic. Disabilities of the Color Line maintains that the Black literary tradition historically has inverted this casting by exposing the disablement of racism without disclaiming disability. In place of a triumphalist narrative of overcoming where both disability and disablement alike are shunned, Dennis Tyler argues that Black authors and activists have consistently avowed what he calls the disabilities of the color line: the historical and ongoing anti-Black systems of division that maim, immobilize, and stigmatize Black people. In doing so, Tyler reveals how Black writers and activists such as David Walker, Henry Box Brown, William and Ellen Craft, Charles Chesnutt, James Weldon Johnson, and Mamie Till-Mobley have engaged in a politics and aesthetics of redress: modes of resistance that, in the pursuit of racial and disability justice, acknowledged the disabling violence perpetrated by anti-Black regimes in order to conceive or engender dynamic new worlds that account for people of all abilities. While some writers have affirmed disability to capture how their bodies, minds, and health have been made vulnerable to harm and impairment by the state and its citizens, others’ assertion of disability symbolizes a sense of community as well as a willingness to imagine and create a world distinct from the dominant social order.

The Color of Mind

The Color of Mind PDF Author: Derrick Darby
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022652535X
Category : Education
Languages : en
Pages : 208

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Book Description
American students vary in educational achievement, but white students in general typically have better test scores and grades than black students. Why is this the case, and what can school leaders do about it? In The Color of Mind, Derrick Darby and John L. Rury answer these pressing questions and show that we cannot make further progress in closing the achievement gap until we understand its racist origins. Telling the story of what they call the Color of Mind—the idea that there are racial differences in intelligence, character, and behavior—they show how philosophers, such as David Hume and Immanuel Kant, and American statesman Thomas Jefferson, contributed to the construction of this pernicious idea, how it influenced the nature of schooling and student achievement, and how voices of dissent such as Frederick Douglass, Frances Ellen Watkins Harper, and W. E. B. Du Bois debunked the Color of Mind and worked to undo its adverse impacts. Rejecting the view that racial differences in educational achievement are a product of innate or cultural differences, Darby and Rury uncover the historical interplay between ideas about race and American schooling, to show clearly that the racial achievement gap has been socially and institutionally constructed. School leaders striving to bring justice and dignity to American schools today must work to root out the systemic manifestations of these ideas within schools, while still doing what they can to mitigate the negative effects of poverty, segregation, inequality, and other external factors that adversely affect student achievement. While we cannot expect schools alone to solve these vexing social problems, we must demand that they address the dignitary injustices associated with how we track, discipline, and deal with special education that reinforce long-standing racist ideas. That is the only way to expel the Color of Mind from schools, close the racial achievement gap, and afford all children the dignity they deserve.

The Color of Hope

The Color of Hope PDF Author: Diane McBain
Publisher: BearManor Media
ISBN:
Category : Fiction
Languages : en
Pages :

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Book Description
The Color of Hope by Diane McBain When Cleo Henderson divorces with a small son to support, she seeks a job as a healthcare worker. She is assigned to Zackary Hughes, an elderly white supremacist. Zachary is a complaining, gravelly voiced curmudgeon who requested a white woman; he is taken aback when Cleo shows up on the first day. Forever hopeful, Cleo works hard to help the old man. Soon she meets Clarence Delacroix. They marry; tragedy follows. Angus Dunne, the grocery boy, always lurking in the background, takes center stage when he meets a green-eyed beauty and faces down some long-held beliefs. The Color of Hope is filled with fascinating characters who all struggle with the fast- moving social changes of the second decade in the 21st Century.

How Cancer Crossed the Color Line

How Cancer Crossed the Color Line PDF Author: Keith Wailoo
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199752915
Category : Medical
Languages : en
Pages : 264

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Book Description
In the course of the 20th century, cancer went from being perceived as a white woman's nemesis to a "democratic disease" to a fearsome threat in communities of color. Drawing on film and fiction, on medical and epidemiological evidence, and on patients' accounts, Keith Wailoo tracks this transformation in cancer awareness, revealing how not only awareness, but cancer prevention, treatment, and survival have all been refracted through the lens of race. Spanning more than a century, the book offers a sweeping account of the forces that simultaneously defined cancer as an intensely individualized and personal experience linked to whites, often categorizing people across the color line as racial types lacking similar personal dimensions. Wailoo describes how theories of risk evolved with changes in women's roles, with African-American and new immigrant migration trends, with the growth of federal cancer surveillance, and with diagnostic advances, racial protest, and contemporary health activism. The book examines such powerful and transformative social developments as the mass black migration from rural south to urban north in the 1920s and 1930s, the World War II experience at home and on the war front, and the quest for civil rights and equality in health in the 1950s and '60s. It also explores recent controversies that illuminate the diversity of cancer challenges in America, such as the high cancer rates among privileged women in Marin County, California, the heavy toll of prostate cancer among black men, and the questions about why Vietnamese-American women's cervical cancer rates are so high. A pioneering study, How Cancer Crossed the Color Line gracefully documents how race and gender became central motifs in the birth of cancer awareness, how patterns and perceptions changed over time, and how the "war on cancer" continues to be waged along the color line.

The color-guard: being a corporal's notes of military service in the Nineteenth army corps

The color-guard: being a corporal's notes of military service in the Nineteenth army corps PDF Author: James Kendall Hosmer
Publisher:
ISBN:
Category :
Languages : en
Pages : 260

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