United States Foreign Policy for a Post-war Recovery Program PDF Download

Are you looking for read ebook online? Search for your book and save it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Download United States Foreign Policy for a Post-war Recovery Program PDF full book. Access full book title United States Foreign Policy for a Post-war Recovery Program by United States. Congress. House. Committee on Foreign Affairs. Download full books in PDF and EPUB format.

United States Foreign Policy for a Post-war Recovery Program

United States Foreign Policy for a Post-war Recovery Program PDF Author: United States. Congress. House. Committee on Foreign Affairs
Publisher:
ISBN:
Category : Europe
Languages : en
Pages : 1284

Get Book

Book Description

United States Foreign Policy for a Post-war Recovery Program

United States Foreign Policy for a Post-war Recovery Program PDF Author: United States. Congress. House. Committee on Foreign Affairs
Publisher:
ISBN:
Category : Europe
Languages : en
Pages : 1284

View

Book Description


U.S. Foreign Policy for a Post-War Recovery Program

U.S. Foreign Policy for a Post-War Recovery Program PDF Author: United States. Congress. House. Committee on Foreign Affairs
Publisher:
ISBN:
Category : Economic assistance, American
Languages : en
Pages :

View

Book Description
Considers (80) H.R. 4840, (80) H.R. 4579.

U.S. Foreign Policy for a Post-War Recovery Program

U.S. Foreign Policy for a Post-War Recovery Program PDF Author: United States. Congress. House. Committee on Foreign Affairs
Publisher:
ISBN:
Category : Economic assistance, American
Languages : en
Pages :

View

Book Description
Considers (80) H.R. 4840, (80) H.R. 4579.

The Marshall Plan and the Shaping of American Strategy

The Marshall Plan and the Shaping of American Strategy PDF Author: Bruce D. Jones
Publisher: Brookings Institution Press
ISBN: 0815729545
Category : Political Science
Languages : en
Pages : 144

View

Book Description
How the United States helped restore a Europe battered by World War II and created the foundation for the postwar international order Seventy years ago, in the wake of World War II, the United States did something almost unprecedented in world history: It launched and paid for an economic aid plan to restore a continent reeling from war. The European Recovery Plan—better known as the Marshall Plan, after chief advocate Secretary of State George C. Marshall—was in part an act of charity but primarily an act of self-interest, intended to prevent postwar Western Europe from succumbing to communism. By speeding the recovery of Europe and establishing the basis for NATO and diplomatic alliances that endure to this day, it became one of the most successful U.S. government programs ever. The Brookings Institution played an important role in the adoption of the Marshall Plan. At the request of Arthur Vandenberg, chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, Brookings scholars analyzed the plan, including the specifics of how it could be implemented. Their report gave Vandenberg the information he needed to shepherd the plan through a Republican-dominated Congress in a presidential election year. In his foreword to this book, Brookings president Strobe Talbott reviews the global context in which the Truman administration pushed the Marshall Plan through Congress, as well as Brookings' role in that process. The book includes Marshall's landmark speech at Harvard University in June 1947 laying out the rationale for the European aid program, the full text of the report from Brookings analyzing the plan, and the lecture Marshall gave upon receiving the Nobel Peace Prize in 1953. The book concludes with an essay by Bruce Jones and Will Moreland that demonstrates how the Marshall Plan helped shape the entire postwar era and how today's leaders can learn from the plan's challenges and successes.

Winning the Peace

Winning the Peace PDF Author: Nicolaus Mills
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 0470097558
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 308

View

Book Description
Politicians of every stripe frequently invoke the Marshall Plan in support of programs aimed at using American wealth to extend the nation's power and influence, solve intractable third-world economic problems, and combat world hunger and disease. Do any of these impassioned advocates understand why the Marshall Plan succeeded where so many subsequent aid plans have not? Historian Nicolaus Mills explores the Marshall Plan in all its dimensions to provide valuable lessons from the past about what America can and cannot do as a superpower.

Henry A. Wallace’s Criticism of America’s Atomic Monopoly, 1945-1948

Henry A. Wallace’s Criticism of America’s Atomic Monopoly, 1945-1948 PDF Author: Mayako Shimamoto
Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing
ISBN: 1443845108
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 225

View

Book Description
Secretary of Commerce Henry A. Wallace was an earnest supporter of the Stimson Proposal, a disarmament proposal submitted to the Truman administration by then Secretary of War Henry L. Stimson immediately after World War II. This proposal suggested direct dialogue with the Soviets over control of the newly-released atomic energy used against Japan in August 1945. Wallace, who had nurtured a deep scientific knowledge in his early life, was trusted in his Vice Presidency (1941–1945) for his scientific skills by not only President Franklin D. Roosevelt, but also scientific administrator Vannevar Bush. Because of this, Wallace’s postwar vision was similar to Stimson’s Proposal and the views of atomic scientists, who believed that basic scientific knowledge could not be contained because science had no national boundaries. Why was Wallace so thoroughly neglected by incumbent President Harry S. Truman and his fellow policy-makers? Wallace’s idea, basically encouraging a joint partnership with the Soviets, failed to find favor with Truman, his aides, and the American public. Their belief was that the US’s secret of atomic bomb was a national asset. This book illustrates that Wallace’s idea of international atomic controls with Soviet partnership – a position embraced by atomic scientists – could prevent a postwar nuclear proliferation. The failure of Wallace’s concept of postwar world order, a product of rejection by President Truman, has revealed an ideological conflict between democracy and nuclear weaponry. Amazingly, Wallace daringly made this historic attempt and kept to his vision, a commitment which led to his alienation and eventual ousting from Truman’s cabinet.

Case Studies in Bipartisanship in United States Postwar Foreign Policy

Case Studies in Bipartisanship in United States Postwar Foreign Policy PDF Author: Richard Allen Fuller
Publisher:
ISBN:
Category : United States
Languages : en
Pages : 1062

View

Book Description


Weapon of War, Tool of Peace

Weapon of War, Tool of Peace PDF Author: Kaete Mary O'Connell
Publisher:
ISBN:
Category :
Languages : en
Pages : 350

View

Book Description
This dissertation examines U.S. food diplomacy in occupied Germany. It argues that the origins of food aid as an anti-communist strategy are located in postwar Germany. Believing a punitive occupation was the best insurance against future conflict, Allied leadership agreed to enforce a lower standard of living on Germany and did not allow relief agencies to administer aid to German civilians. Facing a growing crisis in the U.S. Zone, President Truman authorized food imports and permitted voluntary agencies to operate in 1946. This decision changed the tenor of the occupation and provided the foundation to an improved U.S.-German relationship. It also underscored the value of American food power in the emerging contest with the Soviet Union. Food served as a source of soft power. It bridged cultures and fostered new relationships while reinforcing notions of American exceptionalism. Officials recognized that humanitarian aid complemented foreign policy objectives. American economic security was reflected in their abundance of food, and the dispersal of this food to war-torn Europe, especially a former enemy, made a strong statement about the future. As relations with the Soviet Union soured, policymakers increasingly relied on American food power to encourage German embrace of western values. Occupation officials portrayed food relief as an expression of democratic ideals, emphasizing the universality of Freedom from Want and focusing on well-nourished German children as the hope for future peace. American food fostered the spread of liberal democracy but its dispersal also contained communism. This work bridges diplomatic history and food studies to investigate the consequences and significance of the transnational food exchange. Food aid had layered political, cultural, and emotional implications. Adopting an interdisciplinary approach, this dissertation examines the role of compassion in diplomacy and the symbolism inherent in food to demonstrate the lasting political currency of humanitarian aid. Paying close attention to the food relationships that emerge between Germans and Americans allows one to better gauge the value of U.S. food aid as a propaganda tool. Food embodies American power; it offers a medium for understanding the experience and internalization of the occupation by Americans and Germans alike. Food aid began as emergency relief in 1946, reflecting the transition from a punitive to rehabilitative occupation policy. Recognizing Germany's need for stability and self-sufficiency Military Government officials then urged economic recovery. Food aid was an important piece for German economic recovery, with supporters emphasizing Germany's potential contribution toward European recovery. The positive press generated by the Marshall Plan and Allied airlift of Berlin contributed to the growing significance of propaganda in the emerging Cold War. Food relief was both good policy and good public relations, providing a narrative that cast the United States as a benevolent power in a rapidly changing world. Food aid to Germany underscored America's humanitarian obligations, conscripted emotion into the Cold War, and swayed public opinion on the home front and with the former enemy.

United States Foreign Policy and Ireland

United States Foreign Policy and Ireland PDF Author: Bernadette Whelan
Publisher: Four Courts PressLtd
ISBN:
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 607

View

Book Description
This book deals with United States policy towards Ireland between 1913 and 1929. Focusing on Woodrow Wilson, Warren Harding and Calvin Coolidge, it examines their ties with Ireland and the development of the relationship between their administrations and Ireland. The formulation of US policy towards Ireland was influenced by the US public and politicians, the State Department, British politicians and officials, and nationalists and unionists in the US and Ireland. The author examines the implementation of foreign policy by US representatives in Ireland and Britain. Set in the context of three US administrations, it treats the Irish issues of selfdetermination, legitimacy, state-building, immigration and commerce as well as the Irish dimension to US policy in waging war and making peace, debt recovery, rearmament and economic growth. It offers a pioneering perspective on the views of key policy-makers in Washington and the policy enforcers in far off Dublin, Belfast, Cork and London.

Lincoln Gordon

Lincoln Gordon PDF Author: Bruce L.R. Smith
Publisher: University Press of Kentucky
ISBN: 0813161215
Category : Political Science
Languages : en
Pages : 536

View

Book Description
After World War II, American statesman and scholar Lincoln Gordon emerged as one of the key players in the reconstruction of Europe. During his long career, Gordon worked as an aide to National Security Adviser Averill Harriman in President Truman's administration; for President John F. Kennedy as an author of the Alliance for Progress and as an adviser on Latin American policy; and for President Lyndon B. Johnson as assistant secretary of state. Gordon also served as the United States ambassador to Brazil under both Kennedy and Johnson. Outside the political sphere, he devoted his considerable talents to academia as a professor at Harvard University, as a scholar at the Brookings Institution, and as president at Johns Hopkins University. In this impressive biography, Bruce L. R. Smith examines Gordon's substantial contributions to U.S. mobilization during the Second World War, Europe's postwar economic recovery, the security framework for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), and U.S. policy in Latin America. He also highlights the vital efforts of the advisers who helped Gordon plan NATO's force expansion and implement America's dominant foreign policy favoring free trade, free markets, and free political institutions. Smith, who worked with Gordon at the Brookings Institution, explores the statesman-scholar's virtues as well as his flaws, and his study is strengthened by insights drawn from his personal connection to his subject. In many ways, Gordon's life and career embodied Cold War America and the way in which the nation's institutions evolved to manage the twentieth century's vast changes. Smith adeptly shows how this "wise man" personified both America's postwar optimism and as its dawning realization of its own fallibility during the Vietnam era.